One of the topics emanating from the inaugural CO2 Summit in Austria this month was the increasing growth in dry ice applications, from simply being used as a cleaning application to being part of an array of manufacturing and production processes.

This upward curve could yet have more ascent to scale, as more knowledge in industry creates more opportunities. That’s according to Ken Ege Jensen, CEO of enICEco/Intelblast, a manufacturer of dry ice blasting units in Denmark.

All of the company’s dry ice blasters are manufactured in the central part of Denmark and subsequently supplied throughout Europe and in addition to facilities in Barcelona (Spain) and central Germany, it boasts distributors in most European countries, North America (including Mexico), and Latin America.

Intelblast therefore has a strong grounding in the dynamics at play in the dry ice market and Jensen has seen the growing uptake of dry ice solutions first-hand – key to this is the knowledge and understanding of this technology. “It is the knowledge and experience on how-to-do that grows the market and, consequently, makes more companies see the benefits of dry ice; 80% knowledge, 5% nozzle and only 5% machine – 100% result,” he said.

Looking ahead to future market development, Jensen believes it very much depends on the territory. “In Europe, we still need to see acceptance of dry ice blasting in areas like fire restoration and mould remediation. It is coming slowly, but not as commonly used as in the US.”

“The trend of more private production sites for dry ice – which brings down the cost of transporting dry ice – together with more industries having larger in-house air compressors, creates better opportunities for dry ice blasting, as the cost base is being reduced.”

“More users, with the right knowledge, will create more opportunities. Both for new industries who now can afford dry ice blasting, and the many who tried and either found it too expensive or that the contractor did not have the experience…”

“Dry ice is still relatively expensive, so consumption of dry ice (besides diesel for mobile compressors) must be kept as low as possible, but still with an acceptable cleaning speed.”

“We probably have one of the machines with the best operational economy on the market and with the lowest capex,” he adds, “but I am sure that we will see even further improvements on both fronts.”

These factors aside, Jensen believes there will fundamentally be continued proliferation in dry ice technology adoption – it’s all about that knowledge.

“More users, with the right knowledge, will create more opportunities,” he concluded. “Both for new industries who now can afford dry ice blasting, and the many who tried and either found it too expensive or that the contractor did not have the experience.”

Source: enICEco/Intelblast

10 minutes with…

Read more about enICEco/Intelblast, trends in the dry ice business, and what’s next for the company in an interview with Ken Ege Jensen, in the April edition of gasworld magazine.

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