Modified atmospheres are commonly used to extend the lifetime and quality of produce such as meat and fruit, reducing the need for preservatives.

In foods such as grains, storage environments are composed partly of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen and oxygen.

Edinburgh Sensors offer a range of infra-red based sensors and monitors suitable for operation in the typical conditions found in grain silos or barges, including the Gascard, the Guardian NG and the GasCheck.

The Gascard NG offers a solution for possible gas monitoring needs. Measurements are unaffected by humidity (in conditions between 0-95%), relative humidity, and to ensure COconcentrations are measurement accurately irrespective of fluctuations in the local environment, the onboard pressure and temperature sensors are capable of compensating for any fluctuations.

GasCard

Source: Edinburgh Sensors

The Gascard NG sensor can measure CO2 concentrations in the range of 0-5000 ppm and is available in the form of the Boxed Gascard, which has a convenient external housing for immediate installation and connected by USB for continual data logging and monitoring.

With a response time of less than 10 seconds, the sensor is a fast and reliable way to immediately start obtaining data on storage conditions.

The Guardian NG also offers carbon dioxide detection accuracy, with +2% accuracy over the entire detection range of the instrument (0-3000 ppm).

The on-device screen and set-up menus make it easy to install, there is also an onboard alarm where the gas monitor can act as part of an early warning system to minimise potential losses of product.

All of Edinburgh Sensors infra-red detects are suitable for use in government, trader or farm cereal storage locations due to the sensors’ ability to handle a wide type of environmental conditions for long- or short-term storage.

CO2 Zone

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