As major industry looks to clean alternative energy sources to power its processes, green hydrogen production is being seen as a viable method of reducing emissions.

Seeking to decarbonise the marine industry, energy giant ExxonMobil has signed a deal with Grieg Edge, North Ammonia, and GreenH to study the production and distribution of green hydrogen and ammonia for lower-emission marine fuels at its Slagen terminal in Norway. 

Powered by hydroelectricity, the terminal could produce up to 20,000 metric tonnes of green hydrogen and up to 100,000 metric tonnes of green ammonia, according to the study. 

“Hydrogen has the potential to significantly reduce CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions in key sectors of the global economy that create valuable products that support modern life,” said Dan Ammann, President, ExxonMobil Low Carbon Solutions. 

“This study will explore the potential for ExxonMobil’s Slagen fuel terminal to help reduce emissions from Norway’s maritime sector and help achieve society’s net-zero ambitions.” 

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), hydrogen will meet 10% of global energy needs by 2050 and is considered ‘critical’ to achieving net-zero global emissions. 

The project also comprises part of the Norwegian government’s road map for hydrogen, which aims to establish hydrogen hubs along the country’s coast. 

Generated through electrolysis, green ammonia can be used as a zero-carbon fuel. 

Green ammonia is made by using renewable power to separate hydrogen from water (electrolysis). When used as a fuel, green ammonia has no carbon and generates zero CO2.

Stating that the deal underlines the company’s strategy to make ammonia available where there’s market demand, Vidar Lundberg, CEO, North Ammonia, added, “We will also assess the potential distribution of ammonia from production facilities south of Slagen.” 

ExxonMobil is also looking to pursue further clean fuel projects that involve carbon capture and storage (CCS) and biofuels to help decarbonise hard-to-abate sectors of the global economy.