Hydrogen (H2) generation technology specialist Hydrogenics Corporation has been awarded a $4m fuel cell contract in China.

The Canadian company was selected by one of its certified integrator partners in the North Pacific rim country for a fuel cell order to power buses throughout a number of major metropolitan areas.

The partner’s identity remains anonymous, but Hydrogenics anticipates significant supplementary contracts to be awarded in 2017 on the back of this initial $4m deal.

Daryl Wilson, CEO of Hydrogenics, stated, “Fuel cells offer a greater range of mobility and more rapid fuelling than batteries, last longer, and can be an integral part of a carbon neutral programme if sustainable resources are also used to generate the H2 fuel itself. Hydrogenics remains a compelling choice given our technology leadership in heavy-duty fuel cells as well as the scope of our applications – which span from energy storage to large-scale H2-based energy production.”

“Our orders in China and expanding presence there lay the foundation for even larger contracts in the quarters to come”

Daryl Wilson, Hydrogenics CEO

Demand within the Chinese market for these technologies is accelerating at pace due to the dedication of the country’s government to combat smog and global warming, with aggressive initiatives being outlined to improve air quality.

In terms of future projects, Wilson went on to say, “Our orders in China and expanding presence there lay the foundation for even larger contracts in the quarters to come; I can clearly say that 2017 will be the biggest year ever for us in China but, again, remains the tip of the iceberg for this tremendous market.”

This latest win builds on Hydrogenics’ expansion into China, first announced in 2015, that includes partnering with a number of electric vehicle integrators to bring fuel cell and fuelling station technology into the country. 

In June 2016, Hydrogenics also signed a $13.5m contract with Chinese outfit SinoHytec to co-develop and integrate fuel cell power modules and supply power systems into trucks and buses over the next two years.