HyperSolar,  has commented on the recent announcement from the California Energy Commission (CEC) to invest $20m in pursuit of its plan to build enough stations to allow a driver of a hydrogen car to travel with ease around the entire state of California.

There are currently 10 hydrogen-fuelling stations located in California, more than any other state in the US. Most of these stations are clustered in the Los Angeles and San Francisco regions, supporting hydrogen vehicles throughout the state. This investment from the CEC is anticipated to support the addition of nearly half of the 100 planned fuel station additions, the next being in October in the city of Coalinga, located in the San Joaquin Valley. According to California Energy Commissioner Janea A. Scott, the goal “is to match the number of stations to the number of cars coming in” and then let the market take over.

HyperSolar believes that these hydrogen-fueling stations are representative of the perfect market opportunity for its completely renewable hydrogen production technology. California maintains requirements that each station “demonstrate a plan for sourcing at least 33% of production energy from renewable resources,” stressing the importance of ‘green hydrogen’ as opposed to ‘brown hydrogen,’ which is created using natural gas, a fossil fuel. HyperSolar anticipates filling this void as it continues to progress towards achieving the water-splitting voltage needed to commercialize in real world systems.

“The ‘hydrogen highway’ has long been considered to be an ambitious and out of reach goal, but has now become a reality,” said Tim Young, CEO of HyperSolar. “As major auto manufacturers including Hyundai, Toyota and Honda continue to roll out hydrogen cars, it is imperative that these fuelling stations are completed to support widespread consumer adoption. California will serve as the model for the rest of the country in terms of infrastructure, and we believe our technology will support the growing demand by producing completely renewable hydrogen at or near the point of distribution, in this case, a fuelling station.”

HyperSolar’s technology is based on the concept of developing a low-cost, submersible hydrogen production particle that can split water molecules using sunlight without any other external systems or resources - acting as artificial photosynthesis.