HyperSolar, a developer of hybrid hydrogen fuel production technology, has successfully applied its proprietary three-dimensional oxygen (O2) catalyst within a fully integrated hydrogen (H2) production device that uses readily available triple junction amorphous silicon solar cells (a-Si).

The design of the device will serve as the foundation of the company’s first generation commercial renewable H2 generator.

Last month, HyperSolar revealed its proprietary low-cost O2 evolution catalyst was stable under alkaline water for 190 hours in standalone catalyst-level testing. Since, the HyperSolar team applied this catalyst onto the surface of submersed solar cells in the US-based company’s H2 generator design.

“We believe this milestone clearly demonstrates the potential for a commercial low cost renewable H2 generator, and look forward to continuous testing designed to increase its efficiency.”

Tim Young, HyperSolar’s CEO

This is the first time HyperSolar has tested its new proprietary O2 catalyst in a fully integrated H2 production device. It is now in the process of testing the stability of the device for a period of 1,000 hours, as well as evaluating the overall performance over time. The company anticipates completing this testing by 31st March, and analysing and publishing the data shortly thereafter.

This first generation system is designed to scale up the fully-functional, prototype Solar Hydrogen Panel that HyperSolar first demonstrated last year.

“The vision for our first-generation renewable H2 generator is becoming increasingly clear following the stability and performance testing of this prototype, one that we believe represents the future of a commercial-scale product,” said HyperSolar CEO Tim Young. “For several years, HyperSolar has been focused on the foundational research necessary to establish proprietary technology that is attractive to both commercial partners and leading scientists from around the world. We believe this milestone clearly demonstrates the potential for a commercial low cost renewable H2 generator, and look forward to continuous testing designed to increase its efficiency.”