The North American branch of Linde, has introduced an analytical gas standard specifically tailored to answer dry cleaning regulations. According to Linde, ‘it’s only a matter of time’ before these regulations spread.

The North American branch of Linde, has introduced an analytical gas standard specifically tailored to answer dry cleaning regulations.

Currently, five states – Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Texas – require testing of the soil around dry cleaning operations. However, as Michael Hayes, Head of Environmental Product Development for Linde North America stated, “it’s only a matter of time before these regulations spread across the country.”

“The potential problem stems from cleaning operations as far back as 50 years ago, a threat which remains significant today."

Michael Hayes, Head of Environmental Product Development


According to the firm, this is the first time environmental source testers have a standard for calibrating gas chromatographs for the sole purpose of analysing soils and groundwater that potentially contain harmful hydrocarbons in dry cleaning solvents.

The SPECTRA® DCS calibration standard, is a five-component gas mix designed to analyse the five traditional dry cleaning solvents, all of which are considered carcinogens; tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, cis-1,2 dichloroethylene, trans-1,2 dichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride.

In particular, Hayes was keen to highlight the time savings offered by the Linde’s latest gas standard, he added, “The new SPECTRA DCS standard eliminates the need for testers to rely on conventional standards that have up to 65 components in the mix, with up to 60 components outside their area of interest. Using those multi-component mixes for the five dry cleaning solvent components they’re testing for could take environmental testers up to an hour and a half to get results. The new five component mix reduces the time to less than a half hour, helping to accelerate clean-up while lowering cost considerably.”

As the most recent gasworld issue showed, green-thinking is as virulent and impertive as ever. But, as Hayes described, it’s not just current actions that need altering. Indeed, just as significant are the mistakes of eras past.

Hayes concluded, “The potential problem stems from cleaning operations as far back as 50 years ago, a threat which remains significant today. In past decades, the volume of solvent to dry clean clothes was as much as five to ten times greater than present usage, generating significant releases of potentially harmful hydrocarbons to soil and groundwater.”