Siemens Energy has signed an agreement with TC Energy Corporation to commission a novel waste heat-to-power pilot installation in Alberta, Canada.

The facility will capture waste heat from a gas-fired turbine operating at a pipeline compression station and convert it into emissions-free power. The electricity produced will be put back into the grid, resulting in estimated greenhouse gas reductions of 44,000 tonnes per year.

At the heart of the facility will be an innovative heat recovery process designed by Siemens Energy. The patented technology, licensed under Echogen® Intellectual Property, is based on an advanced Rankine Cycle and uses supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) as the working fluid to convert waste heat into power. Because of its properties, sCO2 can interact more directly with the heat source than water/steam, eliminating the need for a secondary thermal loop, typically required in traditional waste heat recovery systems.

Source: Siemens Energy

The waste heat-to-power pilot installation in Alberta will capture waste heat from a gas-fired turbine operating at a pipeline compression station and convert it into emissions-free power.

“By deploying sCO2-based waste heat recovery solutions, midstream operators can realize greater value than traditional alternatives based on Organic Rankine or steam cycles,” Siemens said in a statement.

“Benefits include a 25-40% smaller footprint than steam-based systems, a 10% increase in compressor station efficiency, and the capability to produce clean, emissions-free electricity.”

As part of the agreement with Canada-based TC Energy, Houston, US-based Siemens Energy will build, own, and operate the facility, with the option for ownership to be transferred back to TC Energy at a later date.

The pilot project is supported by $8m in funding from Emissions Reduction Alberta’s (ERA) Industrial Efficiency Challenge. The new facility is expected to be commissioned toward the end of 2022 and could generate enough electricity to power more than 10,000 homes.