XCOR Aerospace and Masten Space Systems, leaders in the New Space sector, join forces in a strategic business and technology relationship to aid new NASA project.
The companies’ will pursue the NASA sponsored unmanned leader projects. These projects are expected to provide robotic test beds on Earth, the Moon, Mars and interplanetary locations. Using joint marketing of skills and services, XCOR and Masten will target NASA in efforts to become prime contractors.
XCOR’s expertise in liquid oxygen (LOX), methane propulsion devices and non-flammable cryogenically-compatible composite tanks will be used in coordination with Masten’s renowned automated vertical take-off and vertical landing flight vehicles. Jeff Greason, CEO and Founder of XCOR, commented, “Our company work ethic and styles are very compatible, and with XCOR propulsion and Masten VTVL technology, we can solve problems of national interest, and I am excited about the possibilities.”
Masten already enjoys a productive relationship with NASA, having won the $1m Level II NASA Lunar Lander Challenge. Similarly, XCOR has a successful supply history with NASA which saw them provide the LOX / methane engine in2007, an innovation which Time Magazine dubbed an “invention of the year”.
Dave Masten, Founder and President of Masten Space Systems, remarked, “We’ve worked together on many tactical problems over the years and our corporate cultures mesh well. Working together on something like this simply made too much sense. We can’t wait to start working with Jeff, Dan and the XCOR team to help NASA build affordable and responsive landing platforms.”
Andrew Nelson, Chief Operating Officer of XCOR, reiterated venture positivity, ”It’s a no brainer, Dave’s team is the absolute best New Space company when it comes to VTVL and autopilot unmanned operations – they demonstrated that in October by winning NASA’s lander challenge. And we feel our LOX / methane engines are unsurpassed in the trade space today by anyone.”
Nelson added, “We should bring this tandem set of best in class capabilities to NASA, it just makes sense for them and for us.”